Towards a Better Mechanistic Understanding of the Degradation Processes of Perovskite Solar Cells

Carlos Biaou

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2018-3
January 23, 2018

http://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2018/EECS-2018-3.pdf

There have been numerous theoretical and experimental studies of certain perovskites’ degradation pathways. These usually involve theorizing about the effects of humidity and oxygen on the active layer or illuminating the cell under no load and tracking its power conversion efficiency. However, the term perovskite merely refers to a structure. Thus, there is an entire class of materials that exhibit photovoltaic behavior for the purpose of providing power to an electrical load. To fill this gap in knowledge, we studied two types of perovskite—cesium formamidinium lead triiodide (Cs₀.₂(CH(NH₂)₂)₀.₈PbI₃ or Cs₀.₂FA₀.₈PbI₃) and methylammonium lead triiodide (CH₃NH₃PbI₃ or MAPbI₃)—and tracked their crystallographic, optical, and electrical characteristics under various load, humidity, and temperature conditions. These studies give us experimental insight into the degradation process that occurs in these systems. Such studies thus form an excellent starting point for understanding the degradation phenomena that affect such devices and have important implications for their future viability.

Advisor: Vivek Subramanian


BibTeX citation:

@mastersthesis{Biaou:EECS-2018-3,
    Author = {Biaou, Carlos},
    Title = {Towards a Better Mechanistic Understanding of the Degradation Processes of Perovskite Solar Cells},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2018},
    Month = {Jan},
    URL = {http://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2018/EECS-2018-3.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2018-3},
    Abstract = {There have been numerous theoretical and experimental studies of certain perovskites’ degradation pathways. These usually involve theorizing about the effects of humidity and oxygen on the active layer or illuminating the cell under no load and tracking its power conversion efficiency. However, the term perovskite merely refers to a structure. Thus, there is an entire class of materials that exhibit photovoltaic behavior for the purpose of providing power to an electrical load. To fill this gap in knowledge, we studied two types of perovskite—cesium formamidinium lead triiodide (Cs₀.₂(CH(NH₂)₂)₀.₈PbI₃ or Cs₀.₂FA₀.₈PbI₃) and methylammonium lead triiodide (CH₃NH₃PbI₃ or MAPbI₃)—and tracked their crystallographic, optical, and electrical characteristics under various load, humidity, and temperature conditions. These studies give us experimental insight into the degradation process that occurs in these systems.  Such studies thus form an excellent starting point for understanding the degradation phenomena that affect such devices and have important implications for their future viability.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Biaou, Carlos
%T Towards a Better Mechanistic Understanding of the Degradation Processes of Perovskite Solar Cells
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2018
%8 January 23
%@ UCB/EECS-2018-3
%U http://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2018/EECS-2018-3.html
%F Biaou:EECS-2018-3