Adapting Vision Correcting Displays to 3D

Jacob Holesinger

EECS Department
University of California, Berkeley
Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2020-181
September 21, 2020

http://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2020/EECS-2020-181.pdf

Past works in vision correcting displays have demonstrated that it is possible to computationally correct errors in a viewer's eye without the need of additional lenses. This result has exciting implications both for the convenience of seeing up close without reading glasses and for the possibility of correcting aberrations that are not possible fix with corrective lenses such as glasses or contacts. While there has been a great improvement in the quality of images created by vision correcting display algorithms, the approach has yet to be extended out of a 2D setting where it is assumed that the view of the display is perpendicular. Past works have used this assumption because it is both convenient for doing optics calculations and covers a wide variety of viewing conditions. Still, in practice there are many situations where it is easier or even necessary to view the display at an angle. The purpose of this project is to allow vision correcting display algorithms to work in full 3D where correction can be accomplished under any viewing condition. This fifth year masters report was part of a collaborative effort with a Masters of engineering capstone project. Over the course of the year, we implemented a 3D version of past vision correcting display algorithms. We found that apart from the added difficulty of accounting for angles in the optics calculations, there were places where the techniques from past works had to be modified or augmented. We additionally conducted preliminary experiments to help gauge the added challenges of working in 3D as well as the efficacy of our modifications to the original approaches. The results demonstrate a first step in the realm of 3D correction and we hope that these changes to the existing methods will help build towards the final goal of making vision correcting displays practical for every day use.

Advisor: Brian A. Barsky


BibTeX citation:

@mastersthesis{Holesinger:EECS-2020-181,
    Author = {Holesinger, Jacob},
    Editor = {Barsky, Brian A. and Kanté, Boubacar},
    Title = {Adapting Vision Correcting Displays to 3D},
    School = {EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley},
    Year = {2020},
    Month = {Sep},
    URL = {http://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2020/EECS-2020-181.html},
    Number = {UCB/EECS-2020-181},
    Abstract = {Past works in vision correcting displays have demonstrated that it is possible to computationally correct errors in a viewer's eye without the need of additional lenses. This result has exciting implications both for the convenience of seeing up close without reading glasses and for the possibility of correcting aberrations that are not possible fix with corrective lenses such as glasses or contacts. While there has been a great improvement in the quality of images created by vision correcting display algorithms, the approach has yet to be extended out of a 2D setting where it is assumed that the view of the display is perpendicular. Past works have used this assumption because it is both convenient for doing optics calculations and covers a wide variety of viewing conditions. Still, in practice there are many situations where it is easier or even necessary to view the display at an angle. The purpose of this project is to allow vision correcting display algorithms to work in full 3D where correction can be accomplished under any viewing condition. This fifth year masters report was part of a collaborative effort with a Masters of engineering capstone project. Over the course of the year, we implemented a 3D version of past vision correcting display algorithms. We found that apart from the added difficulty of accounting for angles in the optics calculations, there were places where the techniques from past works had to be modified or augmented. We additionally conducted preliminary experiments to help gauge the added challenges of working in 3D as well as the efficacy of our modifications to the original approaches. The results demonstrate a first step in the realm of 3D correction and we hope that these changes to the existing methods will help build towards the final goal of making vision correcting displays practical for every day use.}
}

EndNote citation:

%0 Thesis
%A Holesinger, Jacob
%E Barsky, Brian A.
%E Kanté, Boubacar
%T Adapting Vision Correcting Displays to 3D
%I EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
%D 2020
%8 September 21
%@ UCB/EECS-2020-181
%U http://www2.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2020/EECS-2020-181.html
%F Holesinger:EECS-2020-181